BC Government Invests $27 million to Increase Use of Forest Residuals

BC Government Invests $27 million to Increase Use of Forest Residuals

It is widely acknowledged that in British Columbia the utilization of forest residue (wood fibre leftover after timber harvesting) is very low compared to most other jurisdictions.
In the past, the cost of moving this cumbersome, oddly-sized material compared to the easy availability of further timber stands, has been the reason for so much of the previously-called “wood waste”.

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Madison’s has long written that this residual forest fibre in BC is not “waste”, nor an impediment, but rather is an opportunity for lucrative biomass fuel production.

Details of North America wood pellet prices in the monthly Madison’s Heating Wood Pellet report. See more and download a recent sample here: https://madisonsreport.com/products/madisons-north-american-heating-wood-pellet-price-report/

Not only is the post-harvest slash, or forest residue, valuable to make energy, the lack of utilization in the past contributed greatly as a fuel source for the terrible wildfires. British Columbia municipalities, community forests, and woodlots have been long requesting from the government funds for wildfire mitigation.
As this was not forthcoming as needed, several of these community groups and First Nations have themselves invested in clearing the forests of falldown and of residue, for 100 kms distance, as prescribed for wildfire safety.

This week announced the British Columbia government more than $27 million in project grants that will help create jobs throughout British Columbia will also help increase the use of wood fibre that otherwise would have been burned as slash.

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This was done by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC), which distributes the grants, in partnership with the BC government and the Government of Canada.

“Nothing frustrates people more than seeing piles of slash go to waste rather than be used to help create jobs,” said Ravi Kahlon, Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

This latest round of grants by the society cover 38 different projects in British Columbia, with individual grant amounts ranging from $16,980 to $1.5 million. As of Nov. 13, 2019, about $230 million have been provided by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC to support 251 approved projects.

Madison's Heating Wood Pellet Prices: OCT 2019
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Projects funded by the Forest Enhancement Society of BC help minimize wildfire risks, enhance wildlife habitat, improve low-value and damaged forests, re-plant damaged forests and use fibre for green energy production. See the full story here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2019FLNR0269-002168

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